Croydon Cyclone 2011

This weekend saw the Croydon Cyclone disc golf tournament. It was the biggest UK tour event for a long time, and the Croydon club created a tough course. Here’s the analysis of each hole’s results. As you can see, it was a tough event. Click on the holes in the upper chart to see score distributions in the lower section.

What do I take away from this?

This was a tough course. Check out how many holes had more bogeys than birdies. For the Open, it’s about half of the holes. For the other divisions, just about all holes were bogeyed more than birdied. In fact, the Int Ams only managed 28 birdies in the hole tournament.

What to make of the new and amended holes?

Hole 7, with an OB “lake” right in front of the tee seemed too easy for the top Open players. I think this dashboard proves that. The Open Division managed, on this hole: 36 birdies, 30 pars and only 10 bogies. The Advanced Ams were evenly split (14,42,20), so it played well for them. The Int Ams struggled (1,28,28).

Hole 9 saw proportionally more Open player bogey than Adv Ams, proving that we have too many open players who overestimate their driving and approaching accuracy!

I will leave you to explore the rest of the holes. Feedback welcome…

6 thoughts on “Croydon Cyclone 2011”

  1. Andy,

    The analysis on this I think is spot on and I really like the Cyclone viz to show just how hard the course is.

    Two thoughts:

    1) Why use red and green as contrasting colors? You know my take on this and the color-blind simulator I use. That said, the cyclone is so clear that you could use the same color and it would still be easy to read.

    2) I find the resizing of the top viz to make room for a second viz when you select a whole a little jarring, but that could just be me. Cool technique.

    Very good work indeed.

    Steve

  2. I will provide feedback in the form of a workbook later this evening or week, but the biggest quick issue I saw was the green “13” bar for hole 1 on the birdies side is about twice as big as the the ping 14 bar on hole 8. There are a few ways to address this issue, my preferred is to use a single measure pill with a formatted axis, instead of two measure pills with one revered. When you have two measure pills like you do currently, the only option is a static axis, but that generates a lot of unneeded white space.

    One this view and some of the others, the lack of an axis seems to make it more difficult for me to parse the information. For example on the “Holes and pars” sheet, I have to guess is the axis % of total for the division or the count.

    Thankfully this is on Tableau Public, and I am able to remix it and create views that enable me to answer my own questions. Thank you for this Andy.

  3. Joe,

    Ah, I see your point. Andy would need to show the pars as well but needs half of them to go to the birdies side and half to the bogies side.

    We’re back to discussing Likert issues again. Joe, I think you’re the fellow that hipped me to this:

    http://sfew.websitetoolbox.com/post/show_single_post?pid=20887892&postcount=11

    At one point I added this approach to my big book of Likert scale visualizations but came to the conclusion that there were too many drawbacks to doing this with Tableau (but I’ll be damned if I can remember why I scratched it as it really wasn’t that hard to split the neutrals.)

    Steve

  4. Ah, Joe, you pointed out something I hadn’t even noticed. What I’ve done is shockingly bad viz technique! Oops. Hopefully by the time you read this comment I will have fixed it to be more accurate with one axis. What I will do is hide the pars.

    And Steve – have you yet come up with a way of showing half the par on one side of zero and half on the other?

  5. Hey Andy! We met at the DC Tableau conf in 2014. This is a great Viz! I am a disc golfer and my friends started saving socres, etc…I am having some issues with hole ranking and scores to par.
    I have the Desktop version, is there a way to download this viz and open with Desktop?

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